5 Times ALAMAT Flexed Filipino Prints With Their Outfits

They aren't called ALAMAT for nothing.

Now this is how you do it for the culture.

Deeply rooted in culture that sung about ghosting in seven Filipino languages, constantly tackling the haunting past of our country in their music videos, and also connecting to their audience through the meaning behind each outfit that they wear, mostly in our textiles and prints, P-Pop group ALAMAT is really out here making points. Just when you thought you’ve seen it all, its members, Taneo (from Ilocos), R-Ji (Waray Waray), Alas (Davao), Mo (Zamboanga), Tomas (Bicol), Jao (Pampanga) are here to educate both their fans, the Magiliw, and casuals about our culture all while showing us how to take pride those textiles in a contemporary way that none of us ever saw coming.

READ MORE: Thing That P-Pop Made Even Cooler: The Barong

1. THEIR PPOP CON OUTFIT WAS MADE OF METALLIC INABEL WEAVES

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by ALAMAT ᜀᜎᜋᜆ᜔ (@alamat_official)

Probably one of their most memorable outfits, ALAMAT made it clear that they’re doing it for the culture. In an Instagram post by Hapi Habi, the Filipino brand revealed that the suits designed by Jhay Layson were made of metallic inabel weaves while their accessories were woven from Maguindanao, a weaving technique known as Inaul. That’s not even the best part. The back design of ALAMAT’s suits also had hand-painted scenes of everyday Filipino life by artist Niño Gallardo Malatag.

2. TOMAS’ DENIM VEST WITH CORDILLERA WEAVES

For their ABKD music video, ALAMAT took Filipino streetwear to the next level. Just look at Tomas’ deconstructed vest with Cordillera woven textiles and patches paired with a black hoodie. We also learned that the Baybayin characters in each of the boys’ outfits is the first syllable of their last names.

3. ALAMAT’S HARANA OUTFITS WERE INSPIRED BY THE 19TH CENTURY BARONG TAGALOG

Singing their version of OPM song Porque by Maldita, the boys of ALAMAT did not disappoint. They showed us yet another way to wear the Barong. According to Hapi Habi, “the outfits are inspired by illustrations of Filipinos wearing the Barong in the 19th century. These modernized Barongs are accented with weaves from Abra.” The pastel color scheme they chose were apt for the vibes of the ballad and reminded us of our love for summer. It could also be remembered in the Spanish period, when a Harana took place, all the men in the group were often in matching Barong Tagalog.

4. FILIPINO TAKE ON GRUNGE

ALAMAT wore patches of woven Filipino textiles for their performance at the UP Fair 2021. The black, red, and white color story added to the grunge style that the boys were going for. Who would’ve thought our textiles would look even cooler?

5. THEIR BLACK AND WHITE OUTFITS FOR PORQUE WERE WOVEN BY THE YAKANS OF ZAMBOANGA

If you liked the pastel look in ALAMAT’s Porque music video, you’ll like their black and white outfits even more. (We’ve already got our eyes on Mo’s off-white button-down.) What’s special about this set is that the boys wear the Yakan Tennun textile that was created by the Yakans of Zamboanga and Basilan who often take inspiration from nature.

BONUS: BOMBER JACKETS THAT DEPICT THEIR CULTURE

One of ALAMAT’s goals is to educate fans and casuals about their hometown. They also explained the element on each of their bomber jackets in this giveaway. Take for example Tomas’ set who’s from Bicol that had the mythical creature Bakunawa, or Alas from Davao’s jacket that had the Philippine Eagle.

CONTINUE READING: ALAMAT Takes On Colonialism and Anti-Asian Hate In Their Comeback With Kasmala